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For too long the disastrous policies of the War on Drugs have been justified in the name of protecting young people without granting them space to speak for themselves. 

Catalyst is a year-long fellowship for adolescents and educators from across the Americas who are committed to exploring, expressing and advocating their visions of more just and humane drug policies.

Catalyst is a year-long, bilingual (English/Spanish) fellowship program for high-school students and their teachers from communities affected by the War on Drugs.

Over the course of the year teacher+student teams from across the Americas will come together both online and in-person to exchange their experiences, build knowledge and generate strategies of resistance and transformation.

The fellowship is designed to equip each student-teacher team with:

  • a critical, transnational understanding of the War on Drugs

  • tools to foster productive, intergenerational collaboration

  • new artistic skills to explore, express and transform their experience of the War on Drugs

  • skills to launch local initiatives of their own design that respond to the negative impacts of the War on Drugs within their communities

  • creative strategies to bring back knowledge about the War on Drugs into their classrooms, schools and wider community

  • opportunities to participate in the wider drug policy reform movement

The Catalyst 2019 fellowship consists in three phases:

***We are currently accepting applications from US student+educator teams. ***

Requirements for students

-15-17 years old

-curious, critical thinkers

-open minded & good listeners

-are committed to social justice

-have the capacity to organize their peers and wider community

-are from a community affected by the War on Drugs

-be able to obtain parental consent to participate in Catalyst

Requirements for educators:

-work with high school students

-work in a community affected by the War on Drugs

-committed to intergenerational collaboration

-interested in developing best practices for adult-allyship

-interested in issues of drug policy, drug education & social justice

-have the capacity to implement new curricula in their classroom

-committed to incorporating the knowledge that emerges out of Catalyst 2019 into their teaching practice

If you and your potential student/teacher collaborator meet the criteria above, please apply!

Application for educators: https://forms.gle/r4eKMADwjeymqCJs5

Application fo students: https://forms.gle/2vpxqMiZSkYPguUT8

It is up to you to send the link to your student or teacher collaborator and make sure they submit their application on time.

We are accepting applications on a rolling basis, so the sooner you and your student-collaborator submit your application, the higher your chances of being selected. The final deadline to submit both applications is Monday, May 6th at 11:59PM EST at the very latest. The teacher application should take no more than 2 hours to complete. The student application no more than 3. If you cannot make the Monday deadline, please get in touch with us ASAP (applications@catalyst-catalizador.org)

Take a glimpse at the incredible learning and insight that emerged from Catalyst 2018:

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“I would define Catalyst with three words: inspiring, revolutionary and motivating. Catalyst was a watershed moment in my personal, academic and professional development as a woman. It opened my eyes and inspired me in unimaginable ways. Being a part of Catalyst has been one of the greatest and most valued privileges I have ever been afforded.” 
— Michell, Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, Catalyst Participant 2017

Phase 1: E-learning (April-June, 2019)

Before arriving in Mexico, Catalyst fellows will gain a basic knowledge of the War on Drugs through our newly developed e-learning courses. With the generous support of the Enlight Foundation, Catalyst is excited to be collaborating with the Crew Platform on developing and launching our e-learning materials and online community.

EDUCATOR FELLOWS (12 HOURS)

Through a 6 module course, educator fellows will gain a basic knowledge of drugs, drug policy and the history and politics of the War on Drugs as it has been waged across the Americas, while learning innovative pedagogical strategies for bringing a difficult topic like the War on Drugs into the classroom.

STUDENT FELLOWS (20 HOURS)

Through a 10 module course, student fellows will gain a basic knowledge of drugs, drug policy and the history and politics of the War on Drugs as it has been waged across the Americas. Student fellows will also be guided through the initial steps of articulating the community project that they will work on for duration of the fellowship.

In the event that fellows do not have regular access to computers or internet, an off-line version of the e-learning curriculum will be made available to them.

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This experience was about more than discussing the historical components of the War on Drugs. It was a life experience that offered empathy, knowledge, and understanding.
— Isaiah, Brooklyn, Catalyst 2017
 

Phase 2: In-person Incubator (July 2019)

STUDENT FELLOWS

Dates: July 1 - 21, 2019

Location: Tepoztlán & Mexico City, Mexico

Over the course of their three-week incubator, students will deepen their knowledge of the War on Drugs and learn how the conflict has affected the Hemisphere. Student fellows will build community organizing and advocacy skills via workshops, arts programming and guest lectures from local activists. Once the educator fellows arrive, student fellows will work collaboratively with them to further develop and refine action plans for the community projects they will launch upon their return home.

EDUCATOR FELLOWS

Dates: July 8-20, 2019

Location: Tepoztlán & Mexico City, Mexico

Over the course of their two-week incubator, educator fellows will work in parallel to their student fellows to deepen their knowledge of the War on Drugs, to explore how the Catalyst curriculum can be adapted to their specific educational setting and to learn how to be more effective adult allies to their students. During collaborative sessions, each educator will work with their student to develop and refine an action plan for the community project that they will launch upon their return home.

Both incubators will culminate in a collaborative exhibition in Mexico City featuring the work generated by both student and educator fellows

 

The Catalyst 2019 incubators will take place in Tepoztlán, Mexico. Tepoztlán is a small and charming colonial town an hour's drive south from Mexico City. Known for its tranquility and safety, Tepoztlán is home to an ancient archeological site, a beautiful ex-convent and many breathtaking hikes. 

The student incubator will take place at Casa Cueyatlan, a comfortable, gated facility with ample green space, a swimming pool, a common eating area and four residential buildings. Male and female participants will be housed in different buildings. Gender non-conforming students will be accommodated according to their preference. The location of the educator incubator is TBD, but will be in close proximity to the student incubator.

During the last weekend of the program, fellows will travel to Mexico City to present their final exhibition to the public and to take in some of the city's rich cultural landscape. From the time that students are met by facilitators at the airport upon their arrival in Mexico they will be under adult supervision. 

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I’m glad that my son attended Catalyst. Since his return, I’ve noticed that he is more dynamic and more open to sharing his knowledge with others. It makes me happy to hear about his experiences and all the new people he met in Mexico.
— Esperanza Ordoñez, Mother of Catalyst Participant 2017

Phase 3: Community Project Implementation (2019-2020)

After the in-person incubators, student-teacher teams will return to their communities and launch the community projects they developed in Mexico.

Educator fellows will experiment with adapting portions of the Catalyst curriculum to their classrooms and developing new lessons plans using the skills they honed during the incubator.

All fellows will join an active and dynamic online community that will facilitate keeping in touch with their peers, providing updates on their projects and sharing information and opportunities to get further involved with the drug policy reform movement.

Ongoing support will be provided to fellows upon their return home in the form of additional e-learning modules, webinars, speaking opportunities, access to seed grant funding, etc.

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I support and encourage my daughter’s involvement in anything that helps her become a better, more tolerant, caring and inclusive person and that engages her in the creation of a better society. Participating in Catalyst was precisely such an opportunity for her.
— Bertha Ramirez, Mother of a Catalyst participant 2017
 
 

The Catalyst 2019 Team

Theo Di Castri   Theo is the founding director of Catalyst. He is an alumnus of the Mahindra United World College of India, holds a bachelors degree in Neuroscience and Comparative Literature from Columbia University and received a masters degree from Cambridge University in History and Philosophy of Science. Theo has worked as a facilitator for a youth radio program and as an educator at an after-school community gardening program in New York City. He is currently based in Mexico City.

Theo Di Castri

Theo is the founding director of Catalyst. He is an alumnus of the Mahindra United World College of India, holds a bachelors degree in Neuroscience and Comparative Literature from Columbia University and received a masters degree from Cambridge University in History and Philosophy of Science. Theo has worked as a facilitator for a youth radio program and as an educator at an after-school community gardening program in New York City. He is currently based in Mexico City.

Camila Ruiz Segovia   Born and raised in Mexico City, Camila Ruiz Segovia is the co-director of Catalyst. An alumna of the United World College of the Adriatic, she also holds a bachelors degree in Political Science and Latin American and Caribbean Studies from Brown University. Camila has a background in human rights and security policy in Latin America. She is an advocate for drug policy reform and has participated in community efforts to bring an end to the War on Drugs in Mexico.

Camila Ruiz Segovia

Born and raised in Mexico City, Camila Ruiz Segovia is the co-director of Catalyst. An alumna of the United World College of the Adriatic, she also holds a bachelors degree in Political Science and Latin American and Caribbean Studies from Brown University. Camila has a background in human rights and security policy in Latin America. She is an advocate for drug policy reform and has participated in community efforts to bring an end to the War on Drugs in Mexico.

Diana Rodriguez Gomez   Diana is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Educational Policy Studies at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Her research examines the interplay of armed conflict, peace building, and education in Latin America. She extends her research work into curriculum development and teacher engagement initiatives, in order to translate difficult knowledge about war into opportunities for social change. She teaches courses on education in emergencies, forced migration, and international development.

Diana Rodriguez Gomez

Diana is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Educational Policy Studies at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Her research examines the interplay of armed conflict, peace building, and education in Latin America. She extends her research work into curriculum development and teacher engagement initiatives, in order to translate difficult knowledge about war into opportunities for social change. She teaches courses on education in emergencies, forced migration, and international development.

Nataya Friedan   Nataya is currently a PhD student in Anthropology at Stanford University and a co-founder of Catalyst. Before starting her PhD, she was a Program Manager at the Roosevelt Institute where she oversaw the Women and Girls Rising Conference. Nataya holds a bachelors degree in Anthropology and Political Science from Columbia University. She is a printmaker and painter and she loves her hometown of Philadelphia.

Nataya Friedan

Nataya is currently a PhD student in Anthropology at Stanford University and a co-founder of Catalyst. Before starting her PhD, she was a Program Manager at the Roosevelt Institute where she oversaw the Women and Girls Rising Conference. Nataya holds a bachelors degree in Anthropology and Political Science from Columbia University. She is a printmaker and painter and she loves her hometown of Philadelphia.

Serena Hughley   Serena is an African-American Junior International Studies and Spanish major at Spelman College in Atlanta Georgia. She focuses on African-American solidarity with other groups of color in the Americas with a specific interest in drug policy, mass incarceration and restricted movement. She is an avid reader, enjoys writing short stories and loves photography.

Serena Hughley

Serena is an African-American Junior International Studies and Spanish major at Spelman College in Atlanta Georgia. She focuses on African-American solidarity with other groups of color in the Americas with a specific interest in drug policy, mass incarceration and restricted movement. She is an avid reader, enjoys writing short stories and loves photography.

David Aristizábal Urrea   Born in Colombia, David is an educator, researcher, activist, and an alumnus of the Mahindra United World College of India. He is currently pursuing a PhD in anthropology at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. His research examines the relationship between environmental governance and processes of violence and marginalization in Colombia’s cities. David loves podcasts, poetry, salsa dancing and labor organizing.

David Aristizábal Urrea

Born in Colombia, David is an educator, researcher, activist, and an alumnus of the Mahindra United World College of India. He is currently pursuing a PhD in anthropology at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. His research examines the relationship between environmental governance and processes of violence and marginalization in Colombia’s cities. David loves podcasts, poetry, salsa dancing and labor organizing.

Melina Gioconda Davis   Melina Gioconda Davis is an Ecuadorian-American performer, educator, and gender equality activist based in Mexico City. She is an alumna of the Mahindra United World College of India and graduated from Barnard College at Columbia University with a degree in political science. Melina has a background in social policy research, arts programming, and grassroots community organizing.

Melina Gioconda Davis

Melina Gioconda Davis is an Ecuadorian-American performer, educator, and gender equality activist based in Mexico City. She is an alumna of the Mahindra United World College of India and graduated from Barnard College at Columbia University with a degree in political science. Melina has a background in social policy research, arts programming, and grassroots community organizing.

Gerardo Contreras-Ruvalcaba   Gerardo Contreras is a research assistant in the Area of Reproductive and Sexual Rights of the Center of Research and Teaching in Economics (CIDE), Mexico, and is finishing his undergraduate studies in Public Policy by the same institution. He has collaborated as junior researcher in Mexican and Colombian feminist organizations, and his research is focused on identity and law enforcement, particularly about War on Drugs, through queer theory. He has published at regional journals and write a monthly column in the digital magazine Quintaesencia. Gerardo is a graduate of Catalyst 2017.

Gerardo Contreras-Ruvalcaba

Gerardo Contreras is a research assistant in the Area of Reproductive and Sexual Rights of the Center of Research and Teaching in Economics (CIDE), Mexico, and is finishing his undergraduate studies in Public Policy by the same institution. He has collaborated as junior researcher in Mexican and Colombian feminist organizations, and his research is focused on identity and law enforcement, particularly about War on Drugs, through queer theory. He has published at regional journals and write a monthly column in the digital magazine Quintaesencia. Gerardo is a graduate of Catalyst 2017.

Founders

Theo Di Castri - Benjamin Fogarty Valenzuela - Nataya Friedan - Atenea Rosado Viurques

2017 Team

Aida Conroy - Theo Di Castri - Benjamin Fogarty-Valenzuela - Nataya Friedan - Diana Rodriguez Gomez - Atenea Rosado Viurques - Camila Ruiz Segovia

2018 Team

David Aristizabal - Ana Cureño - Melina Davis - Theo Di Castri - Nataya Friedan - Marco Guagnelli - Serena Hughley - Suleica Pineda -Justin Oswald - Rebeca Roa - Diana Rodriguez Gomez - Camila Ruiz Segovia - Guiet Zuun

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 Our Story

Catalyst grew out of a series of conversations between a group of friends from across the Americas. Albeit for different reasons and from different disciplines, our university careers had lead us to study drugs, drug users, drug policy and drug related violence. Looking back on the drug education we had received as teenagers, we shared a common frustration about the lack of information and space we had been given to grapple with the full complexity of the issues that surround drugs and drug policy.

Why had it taken us getting into university to access the histories and the critical analyses of the War on Drugs that had finally helped us begin making sense of the ways in which drugs operated within our different communities? Why did our drug education focus purely on  considerations of individual use without including analysis of the sociopolitical dimensions of drugs, drug users and the policies that govern them? Why had we not been encouraged to think about the transnational drug supply chain and the effects of our governments' drug policies upon different parts of the world?

We set about imagining the drug education curriculum we wished we had been taught when we were in high school--a curriculum grounded in social justice; a transnational curriculum that provides students with a framework to understand seemingly disparate phenomena in different parts of the world as connected; and a curriculum that moves beyond moral dogma and taboo to give young people a space to ask honest and difficult questions about a topic that is often off-limits. The result was Catalyst. 

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About UWC

UWC (United World Colleges) is a global education movement that makes education a force to unite people, nations and cultures for peace and a sustainable future.     

The Catalyst team works under the auspices of the United World Colleges. The United World Colleges (UWC) movement has been at the forefront of international education since it was founded during the Cold War in 1962. The movement has brought together several thousand students from different nations and backgrounds within stimulating, critical learning environments that push them to rethink their cultural biases and grapple first hand with the complexities of the globalized world.

Central to the ethos of UWC is the belief that education can bring together young people from all backgrounds on the basis of their shared humanity, to engage with the possibility of social change through courageous action, personal example and selfless leadership. To achieve this, UWC schools, colleges and short courses all over the world deliver a challenging and transformational educational experience to a deliberately diverse group of young people, inspiring them to become agents of positive change in line with UWC’s core values:

  • International and intercultural understanding

  • Celebration of difference

  • Personal responsibility and integrity

  • Mutual responsibility and respect

  • Compassion and service

  • Respect for the environment

  • A sense of idealism

  • Personal challenge

  • Action and personal example

In order to extend its values and mission to a wider audience, UWC offers short courses such as Catalyst that focus on a variety of themes from youth leadership to sustainability, from conflict/post-conflict to migration, gender and cross cultural understanding. In accordance with the UWC ethos that education should be independent of the student’s socioeconomic means, Catalyst guarantees full, need-based financial aid to all participants. 

UWC fosters a lifelong commitment to social responsibility and, to date, it has inspired a worldwide network of more than 60,000 alumni, who believe it is possible to take action and make a difference locally, nationally and internationally.

 

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CONTACT

Please don't hesitate to get in touch with us with any questions or concerns. We are also always on the look out for collaborations with schools and teachers who are interested in working with our curriculum. Likewise, if you are interested in mentoring a Catalyst student, drop us a line. 

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